The Psychiatry SHO*

Seven-day psychiatrists

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Unless you’ve spent the last few months in a cave, you’ll know that David Cameron is dead-set on turning our NHS into a ‘seven-day service’.

He hasn’t given much detail on what it’ll look like, or how it’ll differ from the current set-up (in which doctors already routinely work 7 days a week), but the current arm-twisting of doctors into a contract which would force them to work more weekend days for the same pay shows that he really wants it to happen. Whatever it is.

So how might psychiatrists adapt to working routinely at the weekend, instead of just being on-call for urgent jobs and emergency assessments? Despite the mean and unthinking way that the government have gone about their proposals, I do think that psychiatrists could make substantial changes to their practice to acknowledge that mental illness doesn’t just work 9 to 5, Monday to Friday. It depends on the setting though.

I see relatively little point in asking consultant psychiatrists on inpatient units to work routinely at weekends. If they work on a Saturday or a Sunday, it would only mean they’d have to make up their time off on a weekday at some point, so nothing would move quicker overall. Unless other staff were in work on the same weekend days, like junior doctors and OTs, there would be limited effect from a consultant presence anyway. There would also be substantial legal and practical issues to having a different consultant work routinely on the weekend on another consultant’s ward (for example, if all the inpatient consultants were on the rota to come in at the weekend). Patients under section are meant to be under the care of their responsible clinician, and they’re the only people who can give them leave or discharge them. This person shouldn’t be chopped and changed. Also, psychiatric care is like painting a picture – no matter how good the artists are, if too many of them help with the project, you’ll just end up with a confused mess.

Could psychiatrists work more routinely in A+Es? After all, we know that liaison psychiatry services are patchy, but would consultant presence at the weekend fix this? Well…possibly….but in many smaller A+Es a consultant psychiatrist would be sitting around drinking coffee all day. In the larger ones, their juniors would still be seeing patients first (or else how would they learn), limiting their workload. I don’t see why they couldn’t be at home, available for emergencies, as they already are.

What about community and crisis teams – could psychiatrists work more for these at the weekends? For me, this is the most likely setting in which psychiatrists could be seven-day beings. It seems entirely feasible for them to hold emergency clinics and do emergency home reviews, as well as follow-up on the more distressed patients that have arisen during the week. If they work in a team of many consultants, there would be relatively little stress in running a rota of weekend shifts, as the weekdays would still be covered by colleagues. But this too could meet with implementation problems. Weekend GP surgery pilots have had to be cancelled recently as no-one turned up; perhaps that might happen to consultant psychiatrists too.

Whatever the proposed plan, there needs to be recognition of the following:

As always I’m keen to hear how things work (or don’t work) in your area, and your ideas for the way forward.

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